Euglypha Dujardin, 1840 (ref. ID; 3686) or 1841 (ref. ID; 3693, 7550)
Rhizopodia (ref. ID; 2094)
Rhizaria: Order Euglyphida: Family Euglyphidae (ref. ID; 6795)
Rhizopoda: Testacea: Order Testaceafilosa De Saedeleer, 1934: Family Euglyphidae Wailes, 1919 (ref. ID; 7500)
Subclass Filosia (Leidy, 1879): Superfamily Euglyphacea (Wallich, 1864): Family Euglyphidae Wallich, 1864 (ref. ID; 7550)
Euglyphidae Wailes (ref. ID; 7501)

Synonym; Pareuglypha Penard (ref. ID; 1618)

[ref. ID; 1618]
Test hyaline, ovoid, composed of circular, oval, or scutioform siliceous imbricated scales, arranged in longitudinal rows; aperture bordered with regularly arranged denticulate scales; usually with spines; one to two nuclei large, placed centrally; filopodia dichotomously branched; contractile vacuoles; fresh water. (ref. ID; 1618)

[ref. ID; 1923]
Aperture bordered by scales. Plates round or oval; margin of aperture with prominent denticles which are specialized scales; spine often developed. (ref. ID; 1923)

[ref. ID; 3686]
Shell colourless; ovoid, oval or circular in transverse section; composed of oval or circular shell-plates, elongated shell-plates or siliceous spines, may be present; aperture circular or oval, bordered by regularly arranged denticulate apertural-plates. (ref. ID; 3686)

[ref. ID; 7550]
Diagnosis Dujardin (1841)
Diagnosis Decloitre (1961, 1976)
The biometric study.


Euglypha acanthophora (Ehrenberg, 1841) (ref. ID; 3686) reported year? (ref. ID; 1618) or (Ehrenberg, 1841) Perty, 1849 (ref. ID; 661, 1332, 2067, 2110, 2293, 2329, 2330, 2356, 2441, 2683) reported year? (ref. ID; 3283, 3595) reported author and year? (ref. ID; 2094)
Syn; Difflugia acanthophora Ehrenberg, 1841 (ref. ID; 1332); Difflugia setigera Ehrenberg, 1871 (ref. ID; 1332); Difflugia setigera acanthophora Ehrenberg, 1871 (ref. ID; 1332); Euglypha acanthophora var. dorsalis Schonborn, 1962 (ref. ID; 2293); Euglypha alveolata Dujardin, 1841 (ref. ID; 2293) reported year? (ref. ID; 1618); Euglypha armata Wailes & Penard, 1911 (ref. ID; 2293); Euglypha brachiata Penard, 1902 (ref. ID; 2293); Euglypha brachiata var. brevispina Penard, 1902 (non Cash et al., 1915) (ref. ID; 2293); Euglypha brachiata var. flexulosa Penard, 1902 (ref. ID; 2293); Euglypha crenulata var. minor Wailes, 1912 (ref. ID; 2293)
Description; Test ovoid or slightly elongate; three to seven scales protruding around the circular aperture; scales elliptical; body almost fills the test. (ref. ID; 1618)
An ultrastructural study of division in Euglypha. (ref. ID; 2094)
The shell is elliptical or ovoid, circular in cross section, composed of about one hundred and thirty body plates and up to six elongated plates or spines. The aperture is terminal, circular and surrounded by between eight and eleven, usually evenly spaced, denticulate apertural plates. Each apertural plate is roughly oval, between 8.1-10.4 um in length and 6.3-7.8 um in width, often both the denticular and the opposite margin are pointed. The dentate edge is barely thickened on the inner surface around the median tooth and the five smaller lateral teeth positioned on each side. Denticular margins are also seen on the second circle of plates surrounding the aperture. The body plates are arranged in alternate, longitudinal rows, and range from 7.5-9.8 um in length and 6.3-8.1 um in width. Usually the posterior margin of these roughly oval plates has a median rounded projection, this appears to be more pronounced when the plate has an angular shape. Body plates appear to vary in shape depending on their position, the pointed posterior margin of the plate becoming more pronounced in progression down the length of the body, only to be rounded in some instances at the aboral extremity. The elongated plates are dagger shaped, ranging in length from 18-30 um, and usually project from the sides of the body at an acute angle. They may be positioned anywhere in the posterior half of the shell, but are only rarely seen projecting from the extremity. The elongated portion of these plates is thin, hence their brightness when bombarded by electron in the scanning electron microscope, and vary markedly in breadth which in turn alters the degree of tapering. It would appear that narrow and long spines are more flexible, whilst the broader and shorter spines are more robust. (ref. ID; 2293)
The length of the test and the lengths of the spines were very variable. (ref. ID; 2356)
The shell is ovoid, circular in transverse section and composed of about two hundred, oval, shell-plates and up to six elongated shell-plates. The elongated shell-plates are about twice as long as the usual shell-plate and normally project from the aboral region of the shell, but often they follow the curvature of the shell and are not easily seen. The aperture is circular and surrounded by ten to thirteen evenly spaced apertural-plates. Each apertural-plate is roughly circular and carries a large median tooth with either four or five smaller lateral teeth on each side. Apertural-plates not only border the aperture, but also seen in the second and third row of plates inside the aperture. In clonal cultures abnormally shaped shells occur which are either specimens with deformed apertural region, or small specimens about half or two-thirds normal length, with wide apertures (Hedley et al., 1974) (ref. ID; 3686)
Notes; Both Cash and Penard described E. acanthophora with long thin spines and E. acanthophora var. brevispina with short stout spines. There is good agreement between the diagrams of E. acanthophora given by Cash (1915: pl. 35, fig. 2), Leidy (1879: pl. 35, figs. 3, 7, 15-18) and Penard (1902: p. 505 and in Wailes & Penard, 1911: pl. 3, fig. 16), but not between the diagrams for E. a var. brevispina, those of Cash and Leidy (1915: pl. 33, figs. 3, 5; 1879: pl. 35, figs. 1, 2, 4) being quite different from the original Penard figures (1902: p. 505, figs. 6-10). Whereas the spines shown by the former authors are pointed, Penard's are blunt and appear to have broken or ragged edges. As Penard's two varieties - brevispina and flexulosa - differ only in having as their names imply either truncate or flexous spines, features which are considered to be artifacts from observations on clonal cultures reported here, they are listed as synonyms of E. acanthophora. Although the apertural plates in the above mentioned descriptions are similar, there are differences in the distribution and shape of the body plates. For example, Leidy (1879) noted that there were two rows of denticulate plates surrounding the aperture and that the body plates had small projections from these posterior margins. Both Cash and Penard agree with the two rows of denticulate plates, but neither commented on the body plates - except for a reference in the generic discussion (Cash et al., 1915: p. 5) naming just three species with 'scutiform' plates: E. scutigera Penard, 1911; E, aspera Penard, 1899 and E. crenulata Wailes, 1911 - nevertheless they synonymize Leidy's description with E. acanthophora. Wailes (1912) in describing a new variety, E. crenulara var. minor, noted that it was only distinguished from E. armata Wailes & Penard, 1911 (a synonym of E. acanthophora proposed by Wailes in Cash et al., 1915) by the shape of the body plates. Of the eleven varieties listed by Decloitre (1962, 1976), two have already mentioned, E. a. var. brevispina and E. a. var. flexulosa; four appear to be similar to E. acanthophora as described here, these are E. a. var. cylindracea (Playfair, 1918), E. a. dorsalis Schonborn, 1962, E. a. var. fantastica Decloitre, 1965 and E. a. var. longispina Decloitre, 1969; two, E. a. var. equeis Decloitre, 1956 and E. a. var. heterospina Decloitre, 1949, have discrete arrangements of spines and may represent distinct species. The four similar varieties differ size (cylindracea), slight deflection of the aperture (dorsalis), the shape of the spines (fantastica), and the number of spines (longispina). Specimens with misaligned apertures are not uncommon in clonal culture, and E. a. var. dorsalis is therefore considered to be a synonym of E. acanthophora. The differences of the three remaining varieties may also be artificial, but it is not possible to comment further on these. (ref. ID; 2293)
Measurements; 50-100 um long. (ref. ID; 1618)
The length of the test varied between 62 and 68 um, and the width about 32 um. (ref. ID; 2683)
Euglypha brachiata Leidy, 1878 (ref. ID; 1332, 1923) reported year? (ref. ID; 3693)
Syn; Euglypha alveolata Leidy (ref. ID; 3693); Euglypha setigera Perty (ref. ID; 3693)
Description; Spines lateral. Shell elongate and cylindric, slightly near the center; plates circular or oval, imbricating in a regular manner. From 2 to 6 large, long, and recurved spines situated among the 3 rows adjoining the aperture. Habitat submerged Sphagnum. (ref. ID; 1923)
Measurements; Length 92-128 um. (ref. ID; 1923)
Euglypha cashii Ogden, 1981 (ref. ID; 2293 original paper), (Ogden, 1981) Decloitre, 1986 (ref. ID; 4718 redescribed paper)
Syn; Euglypha acanthophora in Hedley et al., 1974 (ref. ID; 2293, 4718); Euglypha acanthophora in Ogden & Hedley, 1980 (ref. ID; 2293, 4718); Euglypha acanthophora var. bravispina Cash (ref. ID; 4718); Euglypha acanthophora var. brevispina in Cash et al., 1915 (ref. ID; 2293); Euglypha acanthophora var. deflanderi Decloitre, 1956 (ref. ID; 2293, 4718); Euglypha acanthophora var. elegans Stepanek, 1963 (ref. ID; 2293, 4718); Euglypha alveolata in Leidy, 1879 (ref. ID; 2293, 4718); Euglypha alveolata var. cirrata Wailes, 1912 (ref. ID; 2293, 4718)
Description; The shell is elliptical or ovoid, circular in cross section, composed of about two hundred body plates and up to six elongated plates. The aperture is terminal, circular and surrounded by between ten and thirteen evenly spaced denticulate apertural plates. Each apertural plate is roughly oval, varying from 8.1-12.5 um in length and 7.2-11.5 um in width. The dentate edge is slightly thickened and carries a median tooth with either four or five smaller lateral teeth on each side. Specimens are sometimes seen with the average number of plates surrounding the aperture but with either one or two being dentate body plates, instead of dentate apertural plates. The body plates are arranged in alternate longitudinal rows and range from 10.9-12 um in length and 7.9-9.1 um in width. Each oval body plate has a median rounded projection on the posterior margin, these projections are not as pronounced as in E. acanthophora. The elongated plates project slightly from the aboral extremity, or closely follow the outline of the shell in the aboral region, they range from 19.6-29.2 um in length and 6.1-7.6 um in width. (ref. ID; 2293)
Discussions; The description of this species is in good agreement with that given by Cash et al. (1915: pl. 33, figs. 3 & 5) for E. a. var. brevispina. As there is some disparity between these two descriptions and the original description of the variety brevispina given by Penard (1902), in addition to the variety name brevispina being used with other species of Euglypha, it was considered that a new specific name would eliminate future confusion of these species. E. cashii is distinguished from E. acanthopra by size, shape of body and elongate plates, but mainly by the positioning of the elongated plates. The three varieties of E. acanthophora listed by Decloitre (1962, 1976) which are similar to E. cashii and E. a. var. cirrata: E. a. var. deflanderi and E. a. var. elegans, they apparently differ only in the deflection of the posterior spines or elongated plates to the shell body. Such features have been seen in clonal cultures as a normal variation, and these varieties are therefore considered to be synonyms of E. cashii. Another species E. tiscia Gal, 1969, listed by Decloitre (1976), although similar to E. cashii is considered to represented a valid species because of its larger dimensions. (ref. ID; 2293)
Etymology; This species is named after Mr. James Cash, who contributed so much to the taxonomy of testate amoebae at the beginning of this century. (ref. ID; 2293)
Euglypha ciliata Ehrenberg (ref. ID; 3223, 3693), (Ehrenberg, 1848) Leidy, 1878 (ref. ID; 4737, 5461), (Ehrenberg, 1848) Leidy, 1879 (ref. ID; 661, 1332, 1923, 2067, 2110, 2231, 2235, 2236) reported year? (ref. ID; 3501) or Leidy, 1871 (ref. ID; 2509) reported year? (ref. ID; 2329, 2333, 2456, 2498)
Syn; Difflugia ciliata Ehrenberg, 1848 (ref. ID; 1332, 3693); Difflugia setigerella ciliata Ehrenberg, 1871 (ref. ID; 1332); Difflugia setigerella pilosa Ehrenberg, 1871 (ref. ID; 1332)
Description; Shell of medium size (40-90 um), oviform. Transverse section of shell elliptical. Moderately compressed. Plates oval, imbricated. Needle-like spines are produced from the entire surface or in a line around the lateral border of the shell, occasionally wanting. Habitat mosses Sphagnum, and aquatic vegetation. (ref. ID; 1923)
Measurements; Length 40-90 um. (ref. ID; 1923)
Euglypha ciliata f. glabra Wailes, 1915 (ref. ID; 5461), Euglypha ciliata (Ehrenberg) Penard var. glabra Wailes (ref. ID; 1332, 2233)
Measurements; Length 76; breadth 38; mouth 15 um. (ref. ID; 2233)
Euglypha compressa Carter, 1864 (ref. ID; 661, 1332, 1923, 2067, 2110, 2233, 2293, 2329, 2330, 2441, 2489, 3223, 3686) reported year? (ref. ID; 3598, 3693) reported author and year? (ref. ID; 6795)
Syn; Difflugia ciliata Ehrenberg (ref. ID; 3693); Euglypha ciliata Leidy (ref. ID; 3693) or Penard (ref. ID; 2489)
Description; Transverse section of shell denticulate with acute margin. Shell large, broadly oviform, greatly compressed. Body scales elliptic, imbricating, and presenting a hexagonal design. Numerous spines on the margin only, singly or in tufts of 2 or 3. Habitat Sphagnum and aquatic vegetation. (ref. ID; 1923)
The shell is ovoid, laterally compressed and composed of about two hundred body plates and thirty spines. The aperture is terminal, circular or elliptical and surrounded by between eleven and fifteen, evenly spaced, denticulate apertural plates. Each apertural plate is oval, between 6.2-7.1 um in length and 4.6-5.4 um in width. The dentate edge is distally thickened around the large median tooth, but this thickening tapers evenly outwards to the three smaller teeth positioned on each side and equates with the normal shell thickness close to the last tooth. The body plates are arranged in sequence and range in size from 7.4-8.2 um in length and 3.4-4.4 um in width. They are roughly oval and often characterised by their hexagonal appearance, this latter feature is variable but the squared nature of the narrow margins is usually distinctive. The spines are positioned along the lateral margins from about the mid-body position to the aboral extremity. The are sometimes in pairs and usually alternate when viewed laterally, one pointing upwards and the next downwards along the length of the body. Each spine has a narrow base from which is tapers to its sides point about a quarter of the total spine length, then it tapes gradually over the remaining three quarters to the terminal point. (ref. ID; 2293)
The shell is ovoid, laterally compressed, and composed of approximately two hundred, oval, shell-plates and up to forty thickened siliceous spines. Spines project from close to the lateral margins at an angle of 90 degrees to the shell surface. Individual spines appear to be semi-circular at their bases but taper distally to a point. Although these spines may vary in length, they are always stout composed with the thin spines of E. strigosa. The aperture is oval and surrounded by either eleven or twelve apertural-plates. Each apertural plate is oval, thickened at the denticulate margin and carries a large median tooth and three smaller lateral teeth. Variation appears to be restricted to the number and size of the siliceous spines. (ref. ID; 3686)
Discussion; The only recorded variety of this species is E. compressa f. glabra Cash et al., 1915, a form without spines. However, variation in the shape and size of the siliceous spines was also reported by Cash et al. for E. compressa, and such differences were considered to be a normal feature. This may not now prove to the case, if, as the information derived from clonal cultures in the present work shows that differences in spine positioning is specific, then it would appear to follow that structural differences of spine construction may also be specific. The spines described here are similar to those reported by de Graaf (1956) and Brown (1910), but they are different from those described by Ogden & Hedley (1980). In the latter report the spines are stout at the base, concave, and taper evenly to a point. Both types of spine are here considered to represent E. compressa, which is distinguished by the compressed shell and lateral position of the spine, but further work on clonal cultures may establish spine shape as a specific character. (ref. ID; 2293)
Measurements; Length 70-132 um. (ref. ID; 1923)
Length 90; breadth 60; mouth 20 um. (ref. ID; 2233)
Shell length 74-112, width 38-69; diameter of aperture 16-25; shell-plates length 11-14, width 4.5-7.6; apertural plate length 8.5-10, width 5.5-7.0; length of spines 12-23 um (n = 6). (ref. ID; 3686)
Euglypha compressa var. glabra Cash, 1915 (ref. ID; 2233, 2235, 2236, 2293)
See; Euglypha compressa
Measurements; Length 80; breadth 65; mouth 20 um. (ref. ID; 2233)
Euglypha cristata Leidy, 1874 (ref. ID; 3686, 4755) or 1879 (ref. ID; 661, 1332, 1923, 2234, 2236, 2441) reported year? (ref. ID; 1618, 3501, 3595, 3693, 7550)
Description; Test small, elongate with a long neck, fundus with three to eight spines; scales oval; aperture circular, bordered by a single row of five to six denticulate scales; cytoplasm colorless; nucleus posterior; reserve scales are said to be collected around the exterior of aperture unlike other species in which they are kept within the cytoplasm. (ref. ID; 1618)
Shell elongate, very little or not at all compressed, of small size (30-50 um). Spines in a tuft. Plates arranged as in preceding species; the fundus is furnished with a tuft of divergent spines, 3 to 8 in number. Pseudopodia rarely extended. Habitat sphagnous swamps. (ref. ID; 1923)
The shell is ovoid, circular in transverse section and is composed of about eighty, oval, shell-plates. The shell-plates are arranged in a regular pattern except for an opening in the centre of the aboral region, from which as many as eleven, long, thin, tapering, siliceous spines project. These long spines curve and intertwine, which suggests that they are not as rigid as the shorter spines of either E. compressa or E. strigosa. The aperture is circular and surrounded by either five, six, or seven denticulate apertural plates. Each apertural-plate is roughly circular and carries a large median tooth with either three or four smaller lateral teeth. The denticular margin of these plates is thickened. (ref. ID; 3686)
Shell elongated, colorless, slightly compressed. Aboral region with a bunch of several 5 to 14 um long, curved spines. Aperture circular, constantly 6 elongated apertural plates, each having one median tooth which is bent inwards, and 3 pairs of smaller lateral teeth. Nucleus with a small central nucleolus. (ref. ID; 4755)
Measurements; 30-70 um long; 12-23 um in diameter; aperture 6-12 um; scales 4.5-9.5 um by 2.5-6.5 um; spines 10-15 um long. (ref. ID; 1618)
Length 33-84 um, but usually ranging between 40 and 55 um. Varieties occur with 1, 2, or no spines. (ref. ID; 1923)
Shell length 55-69, width 14-22; diameter of aperture 7.0-9.7; shell-plates length 9.4-9.8, width 6.2-7.5; apertural plate length 7.8-9.2, width 5.9-6.4; length of spines 20-31 um (n = 3). (ref. ID; 3686)
Leidy (1879) gives a shell size of 40-72 x 10-22 um, the values of Cash et al. (1915), Ogden and Hedley (1980) and Ogden (1984) are also in this range. Our individuals are smaller (30-37 um), like those of Penard (1902) Couteaux et al. (1979). (ref. ID; 4755)
Euglypha dickensii Ogden, 1981 (ref. ID; 2293 original paper, 4718)
Description; The shell is ovoid, laterally compressed and composed of about two hundred and eighty elongate body plates. The aperture is terminal, oval or circular, and surrounded by between eleven and fifteen, evenly spaced, denticulate apertural plates. In a few specimens additional apertural plates are seen in the second circle of plates around the aperture. Each apertural plate is roughly circular, from 5.6-6.4 um in length and 3.8-4.4 um in width. The dentate edge has a large, thick, distinctly curved, median process with a terminal pointed tooth, this is flanked on each side by a medium outward facing tooth and one or two smaller teeth. The denticular thickening equates with the normal shell thickness at the position of the small teeth. The body plates are elongate, ranging from 5.1-6.2 um in length and 1.6-2.5 um in width, and are arranged in alternate longitudinal rows. Around the mid-body region there are some randomly distributed pointed body plates. These pointed plates vary from normal plates with a small shape spike, about 6.9 um long, to tapered spines about twice the length, 9.1 um, of a normal body plate. Although there is variation in the dimensions of these pointed body plates, their presence in a mid-body position is a reasonably stable feature. (ref. ID; 2293)
Discussion; The species described here is similar to three species previously reported from soil samples, namely E. capsiosa Couteaux, 1978, E. cuspidata Bonnet & Thomas, 1960 and E. simplex Decloitre, 1965. It has similar dimensions to E. simplex but differs in the shapes of the aperture plates, which in the latter species have a distinct diamond-shape. Both E. capsiosa and E. cuspidata are smaller species with fewer body and apertural plates, and again differ in the shape of the aperture plates. E. dickensii is distinct in size, dentation of the apertural plates and the presence of pointed body plates in the mid-body region. (ref. ID; 2293)
Etymology; As this species was found in the countryside frequented by Charles Dickens, the nineteenth century author, and subsequently featured in many of his novels, it is named in his honour. (ref. ID; 2293)
Euglypha filifera Penard, 1890 (ref. ID; 1332, 2099, 2100, 2146, 2234, 2330, 2356, 2441, 2456, 3686) reported year? (ref. ID; 3501, 3595, 3693, 7550)
Description; The shell is ovoid, slightly compressed, and composed of about one hundred and fifty, oval, shell-plates. Siliceous spines project from the lateral margins, usually in the aboral half of the shell. These spines are long, thin and may be single or in groups of two or three. The aperture is circular and surrounded by eight to eleven apertural-plates. Each apertural-plate is oval, thickened at the denticulate margin, has a large median tooth and two smaller lateral teeth on each side. Variation appears to be restricted to the disposition of the spines. (ref. ID; 3686)
Measurements; Specimens of the typical form were 60 um long, 29 um wide with spines up to 20 um in length. (ref. ID; 2356)
Shell length 53-66, width 26-30; diameter of aperture 11-11.5; shell-plates length 8.6-10.8, width 4.5-5.4; apertural plate length 8.0-9.3, width 4.9-5.4; length of spines 14-18 um (n = 2). (ref. ID; 3686)
Euglypha laevis (Ehrenberg) (ref. ID; 3223, 3342), (Ehrenberg, 1845) Perty, 1849 (ref. ID; 4737, 5461), (Ehrenberg) Perty, 1849 (ref. ID; 661, 1923, 2081, 2235, 2236, 2329, 2333, 2356, 2410, 2441, 2564, 3501) or Perty, 1849 (ref. ID; 4821) reported year? (ref. ID; 3491, 3536, 3693)
Description; Always destitute of spine. Shell small, oviform, glabrous; transverse section and aperture elliptic to subcircular; aperture bordered by a single row of pointed scales; body scales oval, slightly imbricated. Habitat mosses and Sphagnum; world-wide distribution. (ref. ID; 1923)
The shell elongate-oviform. The spines absent. The scales very obscure, imbricated exclusively at the anterior half of the shell. One nucleus. (ref. ID; 3536)
The varieties of the soil-inhabiting Euglypha laevis Perty, 1849 are shown to be adaptive morphos of an extreme polymorphism. (ref. ID; 4821)
Measurements; Length 22-55 um. (ref. ID; 1923)
The length of the test varied between 45 and 60 um, and the plates lacked spines. (ref. ID; 2356)
41 x 20 um. (ref. ID; 3342)
The shell 42 um high and 23 um wide. The aperture 12 um. (ref. ID; 3536)
Euglypha mucronata Leidy, 1878 (ref. ID; 3686) reported year? (ref. ID; 1332, 1618, 1923, 3693)
Description; Test large; fundus conical, with one to two terminal spines (12-44 um long); aperture circular, bordered by a single row of six or eight denticulate scales. (ref. ID; 1618)
Shell not compressed, of large size (100-140 um). One or two spines. The elliptic imbricating plates are arranged in longitudinal alternating rows; the spines are modified scales with an elliptic embase. Habitat sphagnous swamps. (ref. ID; 1923)
The shell is ovoid, circular in transverse section, and composed of about one hundred, oval, shell-plates. Projecting from the centre of the aboral region are either one or two elongated shell-plates. These elongated shell-plates are about three times the length of a normal shell-plate, of which two thirds is tapered to a fine point. The aperture is circular and surrounded by six to eight, oval, apertural-plates. Each apertural-plate is thickened at the denticular margin and carries a large median tooth with three lateral teeth on each side. (ref. ID; 3686)
Measurements; 100-150 um long, diameter 30-60 um; aperture 15-20 um in diameter. (ref. ID; 1618)
Length 108-140 um. (ref. ID; 1923)
Shell length 86, width 23.5; diameter of aperture 9.5; shell-plates length 9.3-10.8, width 6.2-7.6; apertural-plates length 10.4-10.8, width 6.2-7.0; length of spines 30 um (n = 1). (ref. ID; 3686)
Euglypha nipponica Hada, 1969 (ref. ID; 5026 original paper)
Description; The tests consisting of oblong scales which are not distinctly observed, are finger sack-shaped and colourless or slightly yellowish. The oral margin are usually provided with 6 projections and the surfaces of the tests have a number of characteristic match-wood-like bristles becoming terminally to a minute ball. (ref. ID; 5026)
Comments; The new form is easily discriminated from the known species of Euglypha in having characteristic bristles. (ref. ID; 5026)
Type locality; It has been found in mosses taken from a brook pouring to L. Hijiri. Besides the type locality, it has been already detected from the following localities: the suburbs of Kyoto and Sendai Cities, the Kawarayu Hot Spring in Gunma-Ken, Mt. Ishizuchi and R. Omogo, upper stream of R. Oyodo in Ehime-Ken, and Yonomae-Cho and the Kanome Fall in Kumamoto-Ken. It seems that the new species is a common tecamoebae distributed widely in Japan excepting Hokkaido from these localities. (ref. ID; 5026)
Measurements; Length 32-57; breadth 20-25; thickness 13; oral diameter 7-10; length of bristles 15-18 um. (ref. ID; 5026)
Euglypha rotunda Wailes, 1911 (ref. ID; 2441, 2509, 3686, 7609) or 1915 (ref. ID; 661, 1332, 2081, 2099, 2100, 2110, 2120, 2147, 2538, 2539, 2541) reported year? (ref. ID; 2425, 2456, 2852, 3279, 3383, 3595, 3598, 5703), Wailes & Penard, 1911 (ref. ID; 3382, 4737, 4755, 5461)
Description; The shell is ovoid, and varies in transverse section from circular to oval as it tapers from the mid-body region to the aboral region. It is composed of approximately on hundred and twenty, oval, shell-plates. The aperture is circular and surrounded by eight to fourteen evenly spaced apertural-plates. Each apertural-plate is ovoid, thickened at the denticulate margin and carries a large median tooth which is bordered by two or three smaller teeth. In both cultured and wild animals variation appears to be restricted to the occasional large individual, usually having double the normal complement of shell and apertural-plates. (Hedley & Ogden, 1973) (ref. ID; 3686)
Shell ovoid, colorless, compressed. Aperture circular (= distinction between E. rotunda and E. laevis!), plates nearly circular with two narrow rounded ends, one median tooth which is bent towards the interior of the mouth, and 2 pairs of fairly strong lateral teeth. 2 contractile vacuoles, nucleus with a central nucleolus. All parameters show a rather great variability, especially the size of the idiosomes and the diameter of the aperture. (ref. ID; 4755)
Molecular evolutionary analyses of nuclear-encoded small subunit ribosomal RNA (strain CCAP 1520/1). (ref. ID; 5703)
Measurements; Shell length 34-54, width 14-24; diameter of aperture 6-10; shell-plates length 5.0-7.3, width 2.9-4.5; apertural-plates length 4.5-5.5, width 3.6-4.5 um (n = 100). (ref. ID; 3686)
The mean shell dimensions (n = 30; mean +/- 95% CL; minimum and maximum values in parentheses) of amoebae cultured at 20 degrees C were: length 44.8 +/- 0.9 um (41-50), width 23.6 +/- 0.8 um (21-32) and depth 19.1 +/- 0.7 um (16-23). Abnormal forms were confined in most cases to the occasional appearance of a much larger individual (c. 60-70 um length) from which, if division occurred, a normal sized daughter amoeba was usually produced. The strain isolated for Polytrichum peat originated from a clonal line. (ref. ID; 7609)
Euglypha rotunda var. dorsalis Decloitre, 1969 (ref. ID; 2507 original paper, 4860) reported year? (ref. ID; 2044, 3383)
Description; This is a variety of Euglypha rotunda with dorso-ventral asymetrical shell. Shell elliptical in cross section, covered with oval plates, translucent, colorless. Aperture oval, oblique to the longest axis of the shell. (ref. ID; 4860)
Measurements; Length of the shell 33-38 (35.5 +/- 2.5), width of the shell 17-24 (20.5 +/- 3.5), height of the shell 15-17 (16 +/- 1), aperture of the shell 5-8 (6.5 +/- 1.5) um (n = 15). (ref. ID; 4860)
Euglypha scutigera Penard (ref. ID; 1332, 2233, 3595)
Measurements; Length 90; breadth 63; mouth 20 um. (ref. ID; 2233)
Euglypha strigosa Ehrenberg, 1871 (ref. ID; 3693) or 1872 (ref. ID; 3686) reported year? (ref. ID; 3595), (Ehrenberg, 1871) Leidy, 1878 (ref. ID; 4737), (Ehrenberg, 1871) Leidy, 1879 (ref. ID; 661, 1332, 2067, 2110, 2146, 2147, 2441), (Ehrenberg, 1872) Leidy, 1878 (ref. ID; 4755, 5461) reported year? (ref. ID; 3283, 3501, 7550) or Leidy, 1887 (ref. ID; 2057) reported year? (ref. ID; 2361, 2456, 2852), reported author and year? (ref. ID; 2094, 7076)
Syn; Difflugia setigerella strigosa Ehrenberg, 1871 (ref. ID; 1332); Difflugia strigosa Ehrenberg, 1871 (ref. ID; 1332, 3693); Euglypha heterospina Penard (ref. ID; 3693)
Description; An ultrastructural study of division in Euglypha. (ref. ID; 2094)
The shell is ovoid, laterally compressed, and is composed of about three hundred, oval, shell-plates. Siliceous spines may project from the junctions of the shell-plates either singly or in pairs. They are randomly distributed over the whole of the body surface and vary in both size and shape. The spines are held in position by organic cement and are often dislodged in preparation. The aperture is oval and surrounded by ten to thirteen denticulate apertural-plates. Each apertural-plate is roughly oval, thickened at the denticulate margin, and carries a large median tooth with either three of four smaller teeth on each side. In clonal cultures abnormal forms with a curved neck have been seen. In wild populations differences in shell size and shape were suggested by Chardez and Leclercq (1963) to be related to the type of habitat. (ref. ID; 3686)
Shell ovoid, elliptic in transverse section. Several fairly stout spines, which project singly or pairwise from the junctions of the shell platelets. Aperture circular, 10 to 12 apertural plates. Plates thickened, on the anterior end usually broadly rounded, with one median tooth bent sharply towards tie interior of the mouth, and 2-3 pairs of lateral teeth, whose size decreases from the center to the edge. Nucleus with a central nucleolus. (ref. ID; 4755)
Euglypha strigosa (Ehrenberg) f. glabra Wailes, 1898 (ref. ID; 5461) or 1915 (ref. ID; 1332, 2057, 2233, 2235, 2456)
Measurements; Length 67; breadth 40; mouth 15 um. (ref. ID; 2233)
Euglypha tuberculata Dujardin, 1841 (ref. ID; 1332, 1923, 2081, 2121, 2356, 2441, 2539, 2683, 3686) reported year? (ref. ID; 3595)
Syn; Difflugia alveolata Pritchard, 1861 (ref. ID; 1332); Difflugia areolata Ehrenberg, 1841 (ref. ID; 1332)
Description; Shell elongate-oviform, not compressed. Spines usually absent, scattered when present. Plates round or oval imbricating, presenting a regular hexagonal design. Aperture scales finely serrated, 8 to 12 in number. Nucleus large, spheric. Pseudopodia numerous long, fine, radiating, generally straight, seldom branched. Habitat mosses, Sphagnum, and submerged vegetation; generally distributed. (ref. ID; 1923)
The shell is ovoid, circular in transverse section and is composed of approximately one hundred, oval, shell-plates. The aperture is circular and surrounded by eight to twelve, oval, apertural-plates. The apertural-plates are barely thickened at the denticulate margin, and have a small triangular median tooth with either four or five, smaller, lateral teeth. Slight differences in shape have been reported by Decloitre (1965). (ref. ID; 3686)
Measurements; Length 45-100 um. (ref. ID; 1923)
The length of the test varied between 62 and 113 um; no spines were present. (ref. ID; 2356)
The length of the test was 68 um and the diameter of the pseudostome was 16 um. (ref. ID; 2683)
Shell length 74-95, width 36-51; diameter of aperture 18-21; shell-plates length 13.2-14.7, width 8.7-10.8; apertural-plates length 10.8-15.1, width 8.0-10.2 um (n = 9). (ref. ID; 3686)
Euglypha tuberculata var. subcylindrica (Playfair) Decloitre, 1962 (ref. ID; 4860)
Description; A variety of Euglypha tuberculata which differs by cylindrical shape of the shell. Shell circular in cross section, translucent, colorless and covered with almost circular plates. Aperture circular, bordered with 1-2 rows of plates with dentate margin. (ref. ID; 4860)
Measurements; Length of the shell 89-126 (107.5 +/- 18.5), diameter of the shell 42-66 (54 +/- 12), aperture of the shell 18-32 (25 +/- 7) um (n = 20). (ref. ID; 4860)